Category Archives: News

Mass Shootings and Important Conversations

Elliot Rodger, a disturbed rich young man went on a shooting spree in Isla Vista, a wealthy district in Santa Barbara, California. Thanks to the joys of social media, both his written and videotaped “manifestos” were able to go viral. The reasons he listed for his killing tour included his parents’ divorce, lack of luck with the ladies, and being short.

I get the divorce and the sexual frustration, but being short? That one was new.

Predictably, this has set off all manner of commentary in the public sphere. First and foremost, of course, comes the discourse on gun control. Gun control advocates have pointed out that all of the guns that Rodger used were legally obtained. The Brady Campaign Against Gun Violence has spoken out on the need to tighten controls on obtaining firearms, and one of the victim’s fathers blamed “craven, irresponsible politicians and the NRA” for his son’s death. To be fair, three of the six people who died were actually stabbed to death, but Rodger had plenty more ready in his car that he could have used.

The feminist response to the “manifesto” (can we even call it that? should we?) has been swift and furious, pointing out the misogynism woven through it and drawing attention to his links to the usually peculiar, occasionally violence-embracing “Men’s Rights Movement” (which, by the way, is what exactly?)

But it also denies reality to pretend that Rodger’s sense of masculine entitlement and views about women didn’t matter or somehow existed in a vacuum. The horror of Rodger’s alleged crimes is unique, but the distorted way he understood himself as a man and the violence with which he discussed women — the bleak and dehumanizing way he judged them — is not. Just as we examine our culture of guns once again in the wake of yet another mass shooting, we must also examine our culture of misogyny and toxic masculinity, which devalues both women’s and men’s lives and worth, and inflicts real and daily harm.

Outspoken feminist writers have pointed out that this is not the first time a shooter has claimed similar motives, and Laurie Penny, in her usual no-holds-barred style, has dubbed the attack as the latest example of misogynistic extremism.

Last, and perhaps least, is the quiet conversation about mental health that seems to only experience half-hearted revivals when these tragedies strike. Mental health advocates speak up to point out that mental illness and seeking treatment for it are stigmatized in our culture, so social awkwardness and becomes anger without productive outlets which then warps into repressed rage. The media usually turns its head for a bit, shrugs, and then moves on to montages of grieving members of the community and talking heads interviewing NRA spokespeople on CNN. Unfortunately, this shooting has pitted feminists and mental health advocates against one another – as if Elliot Rodger the misogynist and Elliot Rodger the mentally unbalanced were mutually exclusive.

As both a feminist and a public health advocate, that makes me sad.

However, I think these are all important conversations to have. I much prefer them being featured on prime-time television in shows like Law and Order: SVU and Scandal than to have them forcibly thrust into the spotlight in the wake of a tragedy, but they need our attention nonetheless – and not at the expense of one another. While I’m not quite with the NRA on (lack of) gun control, I do think it’s something of a straw man in this case – California is one of the strictest states when it comes to gun ownership, and preventing mass killings goes beyond cutting off access to handguns (which, for better or worse, cannot be kept from citizens per the Supreme Court) – but conversations about gun violence segue into discussions about poverty and equity, which badly need to be confronted. We need to scrutinize sexism and gender violence as much as society’s assumption that a man’s worth is based on his sexual prowess – all of which hurt men as much as they hurt women, but in completely different ways. And we need to stop sweeping mental health advocacy under the rug, so that people don’t avoid treatment for mental illness for fear of being unable to get jobs in places like the military or the federal government.

Rather than fighting each other for the spotlight, let’s share it together.

Upcoming meetings and conferences

Here are two upcoming meetings/conferences that may be of interest to global health professionals. The first is a meeting, the second a call for papers for a conference in October in Costa Rica.


Monitoring Progress towards Universal Health Coverage
Featuring Dr. David Evans and Dr. Ties Boerma (World Health Organization) and Dr. Tim Evans (World Bank)

The meeting will give civil society organizations an opportunity to comment on the recent draft report by the World Bank and the World Health Organization, “Monitoring Progress towards Universal Health Coverage at Country and Global Levels: A Framework,” and discuss health in the Post-2015 development agenda.

When: Tuesday, 21 January 2014, 08:30 – 12:00 EST / 14:30 – 18:00 CET
Coffee will be available at 08:30 / 09:00, with event starting promptly at 14:30 / 15:00.

Where: United Nations Foundation, 1750 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC
International Labour Organization, 4 route des MorillonsCH-1211 Genève 22 Switzerland

Toll-free dial-in access also available. For more information or to RSVP, email unfevents@unfoundation.org. Space is
limited.


III International Higher Education Congress
III Congreso Internacional de Educación Superior
October 6-10, 2014 San Jose, Costa Rica
Call for Papers
http://www.WCUPA.edu/KCB

Knowledge Crossing Borders: Building Partnerships Through Shared Knowledge

Introduction
The Knowledge Crossing Borders Planning Team is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 2014 KCB conference. You are encouraged to participate in the “Knowledge Crossing Borders: Building Partnerships through Shared Knowledge,” a multi-institutional conference to be held on the campus of the Universidad National (UNA), Heredia, Costa Rica. Program participants will share effective scholarly, pedagogical, and administrative practices with their international counterparts.

Program Objectives
The International Higher Education Congress seeks to build a sustainable future through global partnerships in higher education. The conference theme-Knowledge Crossing Borders, Building Partnerships Thorough Shared Knowledge – includes the research, pedagogical, outreach, and administrative functions of higher education. The conference will examine how knowledge transactions across regional and international borders create challenges and transformative opportunities for cooperation, change, creativity, and innovation.

Travel Support
Individuals will be required to support the expense related to their participation from their own funds toward the cost of participation. We encourage participants to anticipate their costs and apply to their institution, departments or professional associations for any financial support.

Submissions
The conference especially seeks papers that focus on border-crossing perspectives in broad contexts.
Topics should address at least one of these topics of inquiry:

  • Communication and Information Technologies in Higher Education
  • World Peace and Higher Education
  • Higher Education and the Reduction of Poverty
  • Ethics and the Role of Higher Education
  • International Cooperation and Institutions of Higher Education
  • Higher Education and Advances in the area of Health Worldwide

Applicants should submit proposals that comply with the following structures:

  1. Individual presentations not to exceed 20 minutes
  2. Panels or workshops that may be structured with three or more presentations for a total of 60 minutes of presentation and 15 minutes of audience response
  3. Poster sessions that will include 60 minutes of scheduled presence and dialogue with conference attendees

Submissions should be in Microsoft Word, double-spaced, using 12-point Times New Roman font. Full papers (15-20 pages) will receive blind peer review evaluations. Notification will be sent in May. Please include a one paragraph abstract and a few sentences of biographical information about yourself. Applications will be reviewed by peer selection committee. Decisions will be based upon quality and alignment with conference goals.

Deadline for receipt of complete applications: April 1, 2014.

Two Fellowships with upcoming application deadlines: Donald M. Payne (USAID) and Global Health Corps

Below please find information about two fellowship programs that could be of interest to global health students, recent graduates, and new professionals.


Global Health Corps Fellowship: Positions available in Burundi, Malawi, Rwanda, Uganda, Zambia, and the U.S.
To be selected as a Global Health Corps fellow you must:

  • Be 30 or under at the start of the fellowship
  • Have an undergraduate university degree by July 2014
  • Be proficient in English

Application Timeline for the 2014-2015 Fellowship:

  • November 6, 2013: Part 1 of the application opens
  • December 6, 2013: Position descriptions posted online. Part 2 of the application opens
  • January 26, 2014: Applications close at 11:59pm EST
  • February 17, 2014: 2 recommendation forms and Proof of Identity and Proof of Education documents due
  • February – March 2014: Each application is reviewed by at least two readers
  • March 2014: up to 10 semi-finalists are selected for each fellowship position. All candidates are notified of their application status by email
  • March 2014: All semi-finalists are interviewed by Global Health Corps and 3-5 finalists per position are selected
  • March 2014-April 2014: All finalists are interviewed by the placement organizations
  • April-May 2014: Fellowship offers extended

Fellows come from a wide range of educational and professional backgrounds, as each individual fellowship position requires different specific skills. Make sure to check out our fellowship FAQs page.


USAID Donald M. Payne Fellowship (through Howard University)

The Payne Program is designed to attract outstanding young people to careers in international development as USAID Foreign Service Officers. The Payne Fellowship Program provides benefits valued at up to $90,000 over two years toward a two-year master’s degree, arranges internships on Capitol Hill and at USAID missions overseas, and provides professional development and support activities. Fellows who successfully complete the program become USAID Foreign Service Officers. Fellows may use the fellowship to attend a two-year master’s program in a U.S. institution to study an area of relevance to the USAID Foreign Service, including international development, international relations, public policy, business administration, foreign languages, economics, agriculture, environmental sciences, health, or urban planning at a graduate or professional school approved by the Payne Program. At the end of the two-year fellowship, Fellows enter the USAID Foreign Service. Applicants must be college seniors or graduates looking to start graduate school in the fall of the year they apply, have GPAs of at least 3.2 and be U.S. citizens. The program welcomes applications from those with any undergraduate major and encourages applications from members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the USAID Foreign Service and those with financial need. Information and application materials for the program are available at http://www.paynefellows.org.

Application deadline: January 27, 2014

Bill Gates: Global health dictator or just raging hypocrite?

This was cross-posted on my new professional, self-titled blog.

A few years ago, I wrote a piece about Bill Gates in response to an article in Alliance magazine, by global health pundits Laura Freschi and Alanna Shaikh, which argued that Bill Gates had become a “global health dictator” because of the amount of power and influence that his vast wealth gave him in setting global health and development priorities. I took the opposite opinion – that a man is free to do with his wealth as he pleases, and we shouldn’t shoulder him with the responsibility of setting the entire global health agenda just because he has the wealth to fund most of it.

I stand by what I said, but it now appears that potentially more sinister side of Bill Gates and Microsoft is in the spotlight for commentary: dodging taxes. In an editorial in the Guardian, Ian Birrell juxtaposes Gates’s “aid gospel” with the fact that Microsoft, on whose board he still sits, goes to great lengths to avoid paying billions of dollars of taxes.

He made his name as a sharp-elbowed businessman who rode the technology revolution with such style. But these days he is far more famous for his philanthropy, as a saviour of the poor who has made it his life’s mission to change the world for the better. So it was something of a shock to see he is still the richest person on the planet, boosting his fortune by another £9.6bn last year to an astonishing £48bn after a big rise in the Microsoft share price.

Clearly, he relishes his latest role, becoming increasingly influential and outspoken. He loves to lecture nations on how they should give away more of their taxpayers’ money, urging them to hit the arbitrary and anachronistic target of handing over 0.7% of gross national income in foreign aid. He has applauded David Cameron for Britain’s embrace of the target, even condemning a Lords’ committee that criticised this cash cascade, while constantly telling other countries to do the same.

But like those other aid apostles Bono and Bob Geldof, he risks being perceived as a rank hypocrite. For he sees nothing wrong in complex tax avoidance schemes while telling nations how to spend their revenues, notwithstanding the growing body of opinion that aid undermines development and democracy by propping up poorly run regimes. The latest expert to highlight this “aid illusion” is Professor Angus Deaton, the leading expert on measuring global poverty and a former true believer, in his fine book The Great Escape.

It seems a given that Gates will be a controversial figure – obscenely wealthy people almost always are – but he has made a name for himself in the last decade

Public health dictator and tax dodger. Photo credit: World Economic Forum.

Public health dictator and tax dodger.
Photo credit: World Economic Forum.

as a tireless advocate for combating disease, developing sustainable agriculture, and advancing technological solutions to problems of poverty. He spent most of 2011 pushing his Giving Pledge with Warren Buffett, an attempt to persuade the wealthy of the world to donate half of their fortune to charitable causes. He is an almost guaranteed presence at big-name aid conferences and confabs, and now he and his wife are almost considered experts in their pet project areas – vaccination campaigns and green agriculture for Bill, and family planning for Melinda.

With such high visibility, it is highly discouraging to learn just how extensive Microsoft’s tax-dodging practices are:

Moving earnings through low corporation tax countries such as Ireland, Luxembourg and Singapore means the company saved itself, according to one estimate, almost £3bn annually in tax. A Harvard law professor pointed out that Microsoft’s divisions in three low-tax nations employed fewer than 2,000 people, but supposedly recorded about £9.4bn of pre-tax profit in 2011 – more than the 88,000 employees working in all its other global divisions.

In Britain, Microsoft reported revenues of £1.7bn in a single year for online sales on which it paid no corporation tax. This is why if you look at the small print when buying software through its British website, you find you are dealing with a Luxembourg offshoot. A newspaper investigation found a small office there with just six staff handling online sales from around Europe.

It is well-documented that the shuffle of corporate profits through tax havens hurts those in poverty by sheltering tax revenue that would go toward food aid, education, and medicine. What kind of aid champion does that make Bill Gates, if his own company circumvents tax responsibility totaling 3% of the global aid budget?

I still maintain that “global health dictator” is not the right label for Mr. Gates, but perhaps Ian Birrell is right – maybe “hypocrite” fits better.

Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

Politics and Policies:

  • The Food and Drug Administration has announced that it will begin exercising its authority given under a 2009 law, power to regulate cigarettes and other tobacco products that they believe pose public health risks.
  • In an effort intensify campaign to publicize new health insurance options and to persuade consumers, the White House is recruiting mayors, county commissioners and other local officials.

Programs:

  • A health check program has been launched in Accra, in order to reach out to the people of Ghana who are challenged with non-communicable diseases (NCDS), in an affordable and effective way.
  • The United Kingdom (UK) is starting a rotavirus vaccination program to protect the babies from infection which causes diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever and dehydration.
  • Ben & Catherine Ivy foundation grants more that $9 million for brain cancer research.

Research:

  • To help avert 3 million AIDS deaths by 2025, the World Health Organization (WHO) through its guidelines is recommending the patients the start medicine at earlier stage of the deadly disease.
  • According to global Diabetes attitudes, wishes and needs 2 study one in five people with diabetes feel discriminated against them because of their condition. About 16% people suffering from this condition are at risk of depression.
  • According to the United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), Ghana cuts new HIV infections among children by 76% since 2009. It states that one three in ten children in need of treatment have access to it.
  • A report released by the United Nations state that Nigeria has highest number of children with HIV/AIDS virus in the world. It states that the incidence rate has not increased much but the increase in the prevalence rate has remained stagnant.
  • According to the scientists, new World Health Organization (WHO) test- based approach against malaria does not work everywhere. There must be a hard diagnosis before the disease is treated.
  • According to the research results published in the Journal of Infectious diseases, infant rotavirus vaccine is effective against this disease in Ghana. Results showed a significant response in parameters of efficacy, safety and immune impact of vaccine.
  • A study published in the journal’ Diabetologia’, ethnicity should be considered while making guidelines for physical activity. They state that south Asians need more exercise than white Europeans to reduce diabetes risk.
  • According to a research review published in BMJ, high consumption of fish reduces risk of breast cancer by 14%. It replenishes the body with all omega 3 essential fatty acids which can only be acquired from external sources as body cannot manufacture it.
  •  In a study published in Cell Transplantation journal, type 2 diabetes patients who receive self-donated bone marrow stem cells require less insulin. According to the scientist’s good glycemic control appeared as a critical factor in the transplanted and non-transplanted control group.
  • A study indicates that consuming more than 2-3 standard alcohol drinks per day is linked to deadly digestive tract cancers including mouth, throat, larynx and esophageal. They also warn of risk of bowel, breast and prostate cancers.
  • The scientists have found out that the patients of Crohn’s disease also have a virus – enterovirus in their intestines as compared to those who did not have this disease. It also said that the genes associated with the onset of this disease are vital for the immune response against this virus.
  • According to the researcher’s malaria parasite are full of iron which they cannot digest nor can excrete them. Their invention- hand-held battery operated malaria detector will use the power of magnets to detect them.

Diseases & Disasters:

  • Reports state that Lusaka (Zambia) records approximately 185 new HIV/ AIDS infections every day. It has high prevalence rate of 20.8 percent as compared to the other districts of Zambia.
  • The cholera epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo claims lives of 257 people. Lack of proper sanitation and clear water are stated to be the main cause of the outbreak.
  • Polio outbreak in Somalia jeopardizes global eradication. Before this there was no case of this disease for more than five years. This outbreak is reported in its early stages and WHO experts see more cases coming in next few weeks.
  • A report released by Greenpeace suggests that a Chinese herbal medicine contains a variety of pesticides. It is increasingly accepted in the western countries for medicinal use.
  • Reports have shown a new trend of HIV infection among the youths of Manipur (India). Unsafe sex practice has been indicated to be the major mode of HIV transmission among them.
  • According to the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Diclofenac, a common painkiller raises the risk of heart attack and stroke among the patients with serious underlying heart conditions.
  • Health officials are warning that tularemia cases are on rise in New Mexico. Four cases have been so far been reported.
  • Japan and Poland are facing epidemic of rubella. Travel warnings have been issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the pregnant females visiting these countries.

IH News Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

  • May 31 was observed as World anti-tobacco day by the World Health Organization.
  • The Fitness Industry Council Canada has announced June 1 as National Health and Fitness Day.

Politics and Policies:

  • The Republic of Congo has passed a law that prohibits the purchase, consumption and possession of tobacco for minors, pregnant women and mentally ill. The advising and any kind of promotion of tobacco are also prohibited in the country. Smoking is prohibited in public places.
  • According to the World Health Organization On June 10th Ethiopia is launching an emergency mass-vaccination campaign against yellow fever.
  • According to the Ghana’s Minister of Health, the country is committed to ban all forms of tobacco advertisements and promotions.
  • Smoking in presence of children equaled to physical violence in Latvia.
  • Russia’s smoking ban came into effect on Saturday. It involves no smoking in public places and curbing cigarette advertising and sales.

Programs:

  • The World Health Organization (WHO) in Gambia is launching polio campaign to vaccinate 400,000 children under five years.
  • The Ministry of Finance of Lesotho has signed two agreements totaling $17 million with the Global Fund to fight against HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.
  • Professionals for Humanity International (PROFOH) have announced its third free medical screening in this year in Nigeria.
  • After the discovery of polio this week, United Nations emergency team rushes to vaccinate 424,000 people living in a refugee camp in Kenya.
  • Zimbabwe is going to conduct its first national tuberculosis prevalence survey with an objective to determine the national prevalence of bacteriologically-confirmed pulmonary TB among people aged 15 and over.
  • Rotary India extends its help to Pakistan in its polio vaccination drive.
  • The World Health Organization is calling on the countries to ban advertising about the tobacco products.

 Research:

  • Improvement of maternal health and reduction in child mortality in some countries was highlighted in a recently released report ‘Accountability for Maternal, newborn and Child Survival ‘.
  • According to the director of the National Institute of Combat of HIV (INLS), the prevalence of HIV in Angola has not changed since 1997.
  • According to the researchers patients who have developed oral cancer due to HPV can have sex with their spouses or long term partners.
  • According to a study done by the researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, rates of diabetes have jumped 15 fold within a decade for the Chinese Canadians.
  • A systemic review confirms that the licensed medicines for smoking cessation are successful in assisting people to quit smoking.
  • Scientists are using new optics-based single virus detecting methods for determining the exact viral load of a sample by counting individual virus sample.
  • New malaria vaccine developed by the team Japanese researchers has cut the infection rates by 72%.
  • A study conducted in over 13 hospitals in Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam shows that doubling Tamiflu vaccine dose does not help in severe flu.
  • Results of a study warn development of resistance to drug used in treatment of H7N9 virus.
  • A group of scientists discover how a single gene mutation helps brain cancer cells to survive and drive tumor growth.
  • According to the United Nations scientists, Fukushima No.1 nuclear plant has very low radiation doses and there is no increased risk of cancer on local residents.
  • According to the experts nearly one-sixth of young adults in Sri Lanka are overweight. Lack of nutrition education and food culture of the country are reasons for this problem.
  • A study states that particular combination of bacteria in the human digestive system can identify patients who have or are likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.
  • A study shows that the Coenzyme Q10 cuts the mortality rate by half in heart failure patients.
  • Report released by EU says that several new health risks are emerging from new chemicals, products and changing lifestyle patterns. It is important to address these issues all together.
  • According to a study fizzy drinks do harm to the teeth as drugs.
  • New vaccine for lung cancer has been developed by the scientists of Argentina and Cuba. It activates the body’s immune system to promote its destruction.

Diseases & Disasters:

  • Tornadoes hit Oklahoma again on 1st June. Death toll rises to 9.
  • A report issued by the Chinese Ministry of Land and Resources state that the ground water of China is poisoned. It did not address the severity and scope of this problem.
  • Death toll from bird flu has risen to 38 in China.
  • According to the reports of the United Nations, there is a suspected outbreak of Ebola fever in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • According to the reports by Ghana Health Service, cholera outbreak hits greater Accra region.
  • The World Health Organization is concerned about the new strain of Coronavirus which has killed 55 of the confirmed cases.
  • A Starbucks in Hong Kong used water from the public restroom to brew coffee.
  • Pakistan is facing a severe measles epidemic. Since the start of 2013 about 239 deaths have been reported.
  • According to the Ministry of Health, Philippines, new cases of HIV infections recorded in the month of April were 388. It was 67 percent higher than those recorded in April 2012.
  • According to the reports Singapore is facing Dengue epidemic. More than 7,700 people are reported to be infected as of May 25.
  • Frozen berry and pomegranate mix has been reported to be linked to hepatitis A outbreak in five states in U.S.

IH News Global Health Weekly News Round-Up

  • First UN International Day of fistula marked in Ghana to ensure that victims were treated and re-integrated into society in Ghana.

Politics and Policies:

  • The government of Mauritius is preparing to enforce new laws for more graphic warnings on cigarette packs.
  • Voters in Portland have defeated measures to add fluoride to water supply.
  • The Texas House passed a measure that would prevent the state from expanding its Medicaid program.
  • Abortion Law (procedure at the 12th week of pregnancy) in Arkansas is temporarily blocked by a federal judge.

Programs:

  • The World Bank has announced $1 billion in a proposed new funding to help countries in the Africa’s Great Lakes Region to provide better health and education services besides targeting energy, roads, agriculture, cross-border trade and jobs.
  • United Nations Family Planning Innovation to launch two new initiatives that will increase access to family planning and improve maternal health in the world’s most marginalized areas.
  • The Business of a Better World (BSR) has launched an online platform to create culturally accurate training materials on women’s health in developing countries.
  • GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has announced its contribution of $750,000 to the One Million Community Health Workers Campaign in sub-Sahara Africa.
  • Power to childcare centers ban unvaccinated children in Queensland.
  • An independent organization, Save the Children has received a contribution of $500,000 to support its ongoing flood relief efforts in Mozambique.
  • An emergency preparedness ad response center is being launched by the experts from the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Fukushima, Japan.
  • United Nations refugee agency is working to help to contain cholera epidemic in Niger by implementing emergency sanitation and prevention measures.
  • UNICEF is working to prevent further spread of measles in the Central African Republic.
  • Mass vaccination campaign contained the spread of meningitis in South Sudan. The meningitis outbreak was declared by the ministry of health on April 30.

 Research:

  • According to the reports the World Health Organization has applauded Eritrea on its accomplishments in combating malaria.
  • Most EU beaches get clean bill of health, by the European Environment Agency. It says vast majority are clean and safe.
  • According to a new study relaxation of marijuana laws in Colorado has caused significant spike in number of young children treated for accidentally eating marijuana-laced cookies, candies, brownies and beverages.
  • A report by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) says that one in ten parents did not talk to their teen children about dangers of consuming drugs, alcohol etc.
  • In the 66th World Health Assembly, the WHO has praised Thailand for the world’s best governance for medicine.
  • According to the United Nations Report, the number of people in Africa receiving antiretroviral treatment has increased from less than 1 million to 7.1 million over the seven years.
  • According to a report released by the United Nations Japan must continue efforts to deactivate Fukushima nuclear plant.
  • In a report released by the United Nations greater efforts and more resources are needed to improve health of Palestinian refugees.
  • A study shows that potatoes and beans provide most nutrients per penny.
  • According to a study conducted by Dr. Bassiouny at Kornberg School of Dentistry, diet soda might be as bad for teeth health as taking methamphetamines or crack cocaine.
  • According to a study published in The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, two compounds found in cinnamon can play a role in delaying the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • A research presented at the Heart Failure Congress 2013, heart failure accelerates the aging process and brings on early andropausal syndrome (AS).
  • The scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed an injectable nanogel that can monitor blood-sugar levels and secrete insulin when treated.
  • A study revealed that the people who were interviewed while eating at fast food restaurants typically underestimate the calorie count of the meal in front of them by a large margin.

Diseases & Disasters:

  • A category EF-5 storm killed 24 people, injured many and damaged and estimated 12,000 homes in Moore, Oklahoma on May 20.
  • A parliamentary committee has revealed that since last year in Zimbabwe, more than 45,000 people have died due to HIV-related ailments and around 1.2 million people are living with this virus.
  • Disease kills children, causes miscarriages in camps near Nyala, South Darfur.
  • According to Tunisia Ministry of Health, SARS- like virus is being reported spreading among the people of country.